My Cart

Test Bank for Introduction to Criminology A Text/Reader, 4th Edition, Anthony Walsh, Craig Hemmens, ISBN: 9781506399249, ISBN: 9781544337678, ISBN: 9781544353227

Test Bank for Introduction to Criminology A Text/Reader, 4th Edition, Anthony Walsh, Craig Hemmens, ISBN: 9781506399249, ISBN: 9781544337678, ISBN: 9781544353227

Test Bank for Introduction to Criminology A Text/Reader, 4th Edition, Anthony Walsh, Craig Hemmens, ISBN: 9781506399249, ISBN: 9781544337678, ISBN: 9781544353227

Download sample

$55.00

In stock
Category:

Share this product

YOU SHOULD KNOW

  1. 1. We do not sell the textbook.
  2. 2. We provide digital files only.
  3. 3 .We can provide sample before you purchase
  4. 4 .We do not offer refund once the order is completed.
  5. 5. You will receive this product within 12 hours after placing the order
  6. 6. You are buying: Test Bank for Introduction to Criminology A Text/Reader, 4th Edition, Anthony Walsh, Craig Hemmens, ISBN: 9781506399249, ISBN: 9781544337678, ISBN: 9781544353227
  7. 7. ***THIS IS NOT THE ACTUAL BOOK. YOU ARE BUYING the Test Bank in e-version of the following book***

Test Bank for Introduction to Criminology A Text/Reader, 4th Edition, Anthony Walsh, Craig Hemmens, ISBN: 9781506399249, ISBN: 9781544337678, ISBN: 9781544353227

Table Of Content
Foreword
Preface
SECTION I: INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW OF CRIME AND CRIMINOLOGY
What Is Criminology?
What Is Crime?
Crime as a Moving Target
Crime as a Subcategory of Social Harms
Beyond Social Construction: The Stationary Core Crimes
Criminality
A Short History of Criminology
The Role of Theory in Criminology
A Brief Word About the Section Readings
Reading 1: The Use and Usefulness of Criminology, 1751–2005: Enlightened Justice and Its Failures Lawrence W. Sherman
Reading 2: What Biosocial Criminology Offers Criminology John Paul Wright and Danielle Boisvert
SECTION II: MEASURING CRIME AND CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR
Categorizing and Measuring Crime and Criminal Behavior
The Uniform Crime Reports: Counting Crime Officially
NIBRS: The “New and Improved” UCR
Crime Victimization Survey Data and Their Inherent Problems
Areas of Agreement Between the UCR and NCVS
Self-Reported Crime Surveys and Their Inherent Problems
The Dark Figure of Crime
What Can We Conclude About the Three Main Measures of Crime in America?
The FBI’s Ten Most Wanted
Reading 3: Gender Gap Trends for Violent Crimes, 1980 to 2003: A UCR-NCVS Comparison Darrell Steffensmeier, Hua Zhong, Jeff Ackerman, Jennifer Schwartz, and Suzanne Agha
Reading 4: Race and the Probability of Arrest Stewart J. D’Alessio and Lisa Stolzenberg
SECTION III: VICTIMOLOGY: EXPLORING THE EXPERIENCE OF VICTIMIZATION
The Emergence of Victimology
Who Gets Victimized?
Victimization in the Workplace and School
Child Sexual Assault: Who Gets Victimized?
Human Trafficking
Victimization Theories
Is Victimology “Blaming the Victim”?
The Consequences of Victimization
Victimization and the Criminal Justice System
Reading 5: Understanding Human Trafficking in the United States T.K. Logan, Robert Walker, and Gretchen Hunt
Reading 6: MAOA, Drug Selling, and Violent Victimization: Evidence of a Gene x Environment Interaction Stephen J. Watts, Melissa J. Tetzlaff-Bemiller, and James C. McCutcheon
SECTION IV: THE EARLY SCHOOLS OF CRIMINOLOGY AND MODERN COUNTERPARTS
Preclassical Notions of Crime and Criminals
The Classical School
The Rise of Positivism
Neoclassicism: The Return of Choice and Deterrence
Policy and Prevention: Implications of Classical and Neoclassical Theories
Is the United States Hard or Soft on Crime?
Reading 7: An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation: Of the Principle of Utility Jeremy Bentham
Reading 8: Assessing the Effect of Routine Activity Theory and Self-Control on Property, Personal, and Sexual Assault victimization Courtney A. Franklin, Travis W. Franklin, Matt R. Nobles, and Glen A. Kercher
SECTION V: SOCIAL STRUCTURAL THEORIES
The Social Structural Tradition
The Chicago School of Social Ecology/Social Disorganization
The Anomie/Strain Tradition
Gangs Today
Policy and Prevention: Implications of Social Structural Theories
Reading 9: Rural Youth Crime: A Reexamination of Social Disorganization Theory’s Applicability to Rural Areas Matthew D. Moore and Molly Sween
Reading 10: Social Structure and Anomie Robert K. Merton
SECTION VI: SOCIAL PROCESS THEORIES
The Basic Assumptions of Social Process Theories
Differential Association Theory
Ronald Akers’ Social Learning Theory
Social Control Theories
Gottfredson and Hirschi’s Low Self-Control Theory
Integrating Social Control and Self-Control Theories
Evaluation of Social Control and Self-Control Theories
Labeling Theory: The Irony of Social Reaction
Sykes and Matza’s Neutralization Theory
Evaluation of Labeling and Neutralization Theories
Policy and Prevention: Implications of Social Process Theories
Reading 11: An Examination of Differential Association and Social Control Theory: Family Systems and Delinquency Wesley T. Church II, Tracy Wharton, and Julie K. Taylor
Reading 12: Parental Low Self-Control, Parental Socialization, Young Adult Low self-Control, and Offending: A Retrospective Study Ryan C. Meldrum, Jacob T. N. Young, and Peter S. Lehmann
SECTION VII: CRITICAL THEORIES: MARXIST, CONFLICT, AND FEMINIST
The Conflict Perspective of Society
Karl Marx and Revolution
Willem Bonger: The First Marxist Criminologist
Modern Marxist Criminology
Conflict Theory: Max Weber, Power, and Conflict
Peacemaking Criminology
Evaluation of Critical Theories
Feminist Criminology
Evaluation of Feminist Theories
Policy and Prevention: Implications of Critical Theories
Reading 13: Has Criminology Awakened From Its “Androcentric Slumber”? Kimberly J. Cook
Reading 14: Patriarchy, Crime, and Justice: Feminist Criminology in an Era of Backlash Meda Chesney-Lind
SECTION VIII: INDIVIDUAL TRAITS AND CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR
Basic Assumptions of the Psychosocial Perspective on Criminal Behavior
Intelligence
The IQ/Crime Connection
Temperament and Personality
Conscience and Arousal
Glenn Walters’s Lifestyle Theory
The Antisocial Personalities
Evaluation of the Psychosocial Perspective
Policy and Prevention: Implications of Psychosocial Theories
Reading 15: What Is the Effect of IQ on Offending? Daniel P. Mears and Joshua C. Cochran
Reading 16: Recidivism in Released Lifestyle Change Program Participants Glen D. Walters
SECTION IX: BIOSOCIAL APPROACHES
Behavior Genetics
Gene-Environment Interaction and Correlation
Behavior Genetics and Criminal Behavior
Molecular Genetics
Evolutionary Psychology
The Evolution of Criminal Traits
The Neurosciences
Some Other Biosocial Risk Factors
Evaluation of the Biosocial Perspective
Policy and Prevention: Implications of Biosocial Theories
Reading 17: A Theory Explaining Biological Correlates of Criminality Lee Ellis
Reading 18: A Gene-Based Evolutionary Explanation for the Association Between Criminal Involvement and Number of Sex Partners Kevin M. Beaver, John P. Wright, and Anthony Walsh
SECTION X: DEVELOPMENTAL THEORIES: FROM DELINQUENCY TO CRIME TO DESISTANCE
Risk and Protective Factors for Serious Delinquency
Major Developmental Theories
Evaluation of Developmental Theories
Policy and Prevention: Implications of Developmental Theories
Reading 19: The Adolescence-Limited/Life-Course Persistent Theory of Antisocial Behavior: What Have We Learned? Terrie E. Moffitt and Anthony Walsh
Reading 20: A Life-Course View of the Development of Crime Robert J. Sampson and John H. Laub
SECTION XI: VIOLENT CRIMES
Murder
Rape
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Domestic Violence
Gun Violence
Theories of Violence
Violence and Inequality
Reading 21: Getting the Upper Hand: Scripts for Managing Victim Resistance in Carjackings Heith Copes, Andy Hochstetler, and Michael Cherbonneau
Reading 22: The Abuse of Technology in Domestic Violence and Stalking Delanie Woodlock
SECTION XII: MULTIPLE MURDER AND TERRORISM
Mass, Spree, and Serial Murder
Terrorism
Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant
Reading 23: African Americans and Serial Killing in the Media: The Myth and the Reality Anthony Walsh
Reading 24: Close Cousins or Distant Relatives? The Relationship Between Terrorism and Hate Crime Kathleen Deloughery, Ryan D. King, and Victor Asal
SECTION XIII: PROPERTY CRIME
Larceny/Theft
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft
Arson
Crimes of Guile and Deceit: Embezzlement, Fraud, and Forgery/Counterfeiting
Cybercrime: Oh What a Tangled World Wide Web We Weave
Reading 25: The Impact of Neighborhood Context on Spatiotemporal Patterns of Burglary Matt R. Nobles, Jeffrey T. Ward, and Rob Tillyer
Reading 26: Exploring the Subculture of Ideologically Motivated Cyber-Attackers Thomas J. Holt, Joshua D. Freilich, and Steven M. Chermak
SECTION XIV: PUBLIC ORDER CRIME
The Scope of the Alcohol/Crime Problem
The Effects of Alcohol and Context on Behavior
Drunk Driving
Alcoholism: Type I and Type II
Illegal Drugs and Crime
Prostitution and Commercialized Vice
Reading 27: Medical Marijuana and Crime: Further Evidence From the Western States Edward M. Shepard and Paul R. Blackley
Reading 28: DUI Offenders’ Beliefs About DUI Statutes and DUI Law Enforcement: Implications for Deterrence Marianne Goodfellow and Catharine Kilgore
SECTION XV: WHITE-COLLAR AND ORGANIZED CRIME
The Concept of White-Collar Crime
Occupational Crime
Corporate Crime
Organized Crime
Theories of Organized Crime
Reading 29: Criminal Thinking and Identity in Male White-Collar Offenders Glenn D. Walters and Matthew D. Geyer
Reading 30: Corporate Environmental Crime and Environmental Justice Matthew Greife, Paul B. Stretesky, Tara O’Connor Shelley, and Mark Pogrebin
Glossary
References
Index
About the Authors

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Test Bank for Introduction to Criminology A Text/Reader, 4th Edition, Anthony Walsh, Craig Hemmens, ISBN: 9781506399249, ISBN: 9781544337678, ISBN: 9781544353227”